events, Short Fiction, stories

Stories of Survival Release

Pleased to announce that Stories of Survival published by Deadset Press was released on 21 August, 2021. This speculative fiction charity anthology is in honour of Australian speculative fiction writer and mentor to many, the late Aiki Flinthart, with all proceeds going to the Melanoma Foundation to help with the fight against cancer.

This anthology includes many wonderful stories from Australian and New Zealand speculative fiction authors. Featuring my own Fae-inspired short story “Three Tasks for the Sidhe”, you can read more about the research behind the story here.


More details on how to purchase ebook or paperback copies of Stories of Survival can be found here.

events, Writing

2021 Ditmar SF Awards Nominations!

It’s that time to the year when Australian science fiction, fantasy and horror writers and fandom nominate favourite collections, short stories, novels and illustrated works.

Celebrating the best of our Australian writers and active members in fandom is a key goal of the Ditmar Awards. For writers and fans, here’s the eligibility list for 2020 – you can nominate your favourites here!

I have a few short stories eligible from 2020, so while you’re nominating favourites, also consider these if you’ve read and enjoyed my writing!

“A Handful of Dead Leaves”, Alannah K. Pearson [ACT], in Greed (Seven Deadly Sins 5), Black Hare Press.

“The Bargain”, Alannah K. Pearson [ACT], in Unnatural Order, CSFG Publishing.

“The Bull of Heaven”, Alannah K. Pearson [ACT], in Taurus: Speculative Fiction Inspired by the Zodiac, Deadset Press.

“The Golden Lion-Monkey”, Alannah K. Pearson [ACT], in Leo: Speculative Fiction Inspired by the Zodiac, Deadset Press.

I would also like to draw attention to a few of my favourites for these categories from 2020:

Best Collected Works

Red New Day & Other Microfictions by Angela Slatter [QLD], Brain Jar Press.

Songs for Dark Seasons by Lisa L. Hannett [SA], Ticonderoga Publications.

Best Novel

Flyaway, Kathleen Jennings [QLD], Pan Macmillan Australia.

Best New Talent

Nikky (N M) Lee [NZ/WA], short stories including work in AntipodeanSF, Breach Magazine, Things In the Well and Deadset Press publications.

Get nominating as entries close midnight 15th August (+10 GMT). Support your favourite writers and active members in fandom!

reads, Recent Reads

Whispers in the Dark

Publisher’s Description

Two decades into an eternal sentence in the impenetrable Void for daring to rebel against the might of the Empire, and Agent Ivory is ready to give up on life entirely, even if the unseen Warden of the prison won’t ever let him die.

But when a mysterious voice in the darkness visits him in his isolation, the prisoner is determined to see the sun on his face once again, even if the outside world is not what it once was…


Review

I recently read Whispers in the Dark by Australian author K.B. Elijah, a novella blending science-fiction and dark fiction.

The protagonist, Agent Ivory, has been imprisoned in an inescapable cell, his body held in stasis where he cannot die nor have hope of escape nor rescue. From these bleak beginnings, it is the promise of hope that proves the greatest torment to Agent Ivory. Despite the improbable, Agent Ivory escapes the prison known as the Void, aided by the whispering voice only he seems to hear. Guided on his escape, Ivory cannot shake his paranoid thoughts of pursuit, of hope dashed should he fail to escape and seek revenge for his imprisonment. It is this dark offering which the Void failed to crush, the promise of hope that will prove to be Agent Ivory’s greatest weapon or failure.

Final Thoughts

Whispers in the Dark was an intriguing psychological story combining elements of science fiction and dark fiction, exploring the strongest emotion in the darkness, is always hope.

Conclusion

A great novella from a new voice in Australasian speculative fiction. Recommended for those who enjoy a psychological read, literary tale where dark fiction blends into science fiction.

events, Writing

Scorpio Anthology Release


I am excited to announce the release of Scorpio (The Zodiac Series, #11) from Deadset Press that launched on 28th March, 2021. I had the great pleasure of co-editing this zodiac- themed anthology featuring short stories inspired by the Scorpio zodiac including my Gaslamp fantasy story “Serket’s Curse”. You can read more about my research into Egyptology and the creation of an alternate Victorian era Dublin here.

If you are interested in purchasing an ebook or paperback copy of Scorpio (The Zodiac Series, #11) you can find more details here.

events, Writing

Avenge Anthology Release


Thrilled to announce the release of Avenge (Five Hundred Fiction, #2) on 23rd March, 2021. This flash fiction anthology published by Black Hare Press on the theme of superheroes and villains features my dark fantasy, anti-hero story, “The Hero of Silversmiths”. You can read more about that here.

If you’re interested in reading this great collection of superhero-supervillains inspired stories, you can find more details on purchasing ebook and paperback copies here.

events, Writing

Lost Lore and Legends Anthology Release

Pleased to announce the release on 22nd March, 2021 of micro-fiction anthology Lost Lore and Legends published by Breaking Rules Publishing Europe and featuring five of my 100 word drabbles inspired by European folklore and mythologies.

Lost Lore and Legends explores a variety of legends, mythologies and folklore from European tradition. Two of my drabbles, “The Troll-Witch” and “The Elf Stone” were inspired by Icelandic folklore and legend, “The Seelie Court” was based on Scottish Fae folklore, while “Pixie-Touched” explores the dark Cornish lore of pixies and madness, and “Oak and Holly” tells of the physical manifestation of the summer and winter kings, forever duelling for supremacy. If you are interested in the research behind these five drabbles, you can read more here.

Interested in purchasing an ebook, paperback or limited hardback edition of Lost Lore and Legends? More details and links can be found here.

Short Fiction, Writing

Forthcoming: Dark Fiction Anthology

Watch (Five Hundred Fiction, #3)

Pleased to announce my flash fiction story “The Eldritch Wood” will feature in Watch (Five Hundred Fiction, #3) to be published in 2021 by Black Hare Press! All flash fiction in this anthology is inspired by the theme of stalking. My flash fiction story “The Eldritch Wood” is inspired by gothic folklore of forests and dangers of the Fae beings.

Release dates and how to purchase a copy of the Watch (Five Hundred Fiction, #3) will be updated when available. Keep an eye on my publications page here.

Short Fiction, Writing

Forthcoming: Heroes & Villains Anthology

Avenge (Five Hundred Fiction, #2)

Pleased to announce my flash fiction story “The Hero of Silversmiths” will feature in Avenge (Five Hundred Fiction, #2) to be published in 2021 by Black Hare Press! All flash fiction in this anthology is inspired by the theme of heroes, anti-heroes or villains.

Release dates and how to purchase a copy of the Avenge (Five Hundred Fiction, #2) will be updated when available. Keep an eye on my publications page here.

Short Fiction, Writing

Forthcoming: Folklore Anthology

I am very pleased to announce my microfiction pieces will feature in Lost Lore and Legends to be published by Breaking Rules Publishing Europe! Lost Lore and Legends anthology will consist of 100 word “drabbles” or microfiction pieces inspired by European folklore, legends and mythologies.

Five of my microfiction pieces will be featured, including original microfiction such as “The Troll-Witch”, “The Seelie Court”, “The Elf Stone”, “Pixie-Touched”, and “The Oak and Holly Kings”. You can read more about the research behind these microfiction stories here.

More details will follow on release dates for Lost Lore and Legends and where ebook and paperback copies can be purchased. Check my Short Fiction Publications for purchase links and further details.

Short Fiction

European Folklore

The past several weeks, I have been exploring many different aspects of European folklore, particularly involving the Fae. Below is a series of some of my research favourites, fae beings and associated folklore.


Seelie and Unseelie Fae

In Scotland, the Fae are often divided into the Seelie and Unseelie courts, or the Light and Dark , respectively. Unlike the Irish Fair Folk, the Seelie and Unseelie beings follow a stricter divide, those fae which are malevolent are found in the Unseelie Courts, while those who are more kindly toward mortals such as brownies (but like all fae beings, this does not mean there is no in dealing with the seelie. Just with all Fae beings in Icelandic, Irish and Welsh folklore, the tendencies of the Fae are not comprehensible by mortal means and their own needs will almost always take precedence.


Elf-Stones

In Iceland, elves are an integral part of Icelandic culture with folklore infused throughout everyday Icelandic life. Elf-stones as they are sometimes called are believed to be doorways to the underground realms and otherworldly lands where elves dwell. The disturbance of an elf-stones is often considered a major concern with recent road construction and a series of disasters befalling the site, workers and nearby region occurring when a recognised elf-stone was moved. Subsequently, the stone was relocated and the course of the highway adjusted to avoid disturbing the area further.

In Icelandic legend, the renowned waterfall Skogafoss, a spectacular waterfall in southern Iceland, fed by glacial melt is also associated with a legend of elves, buried treasure and the founding of the Icelandic landscape. A Viking Age sorcerer, Þrasi Þórólfsson directed the flow of two rivers threatening the drown nearby villages sparked the volcanic eruption of in the Mýrdalsjökull Caldera. According to the legend, a chest containing a valuable and powerful symbol of Þrasi’s magic was stored and guarded by the elves at Skogafoss until his return. Þrasi’s ring is believed to be just one small part of the treasure the sorcerer left buried and guarded behind Skogafoss but never returned to claim.


The Oak and Holly Kings

Throughout the British Isles and in some Germanic folklore, the Oak and Holly kings are ancient rivals, a timeless battle between Summer and Winter, Although both kings are sometimes depicted as older men the elemental and enduring nature of each gaining dominance only long enough until the next seasonal change. There have been some attention paid to the similarities with the ancient legend of the Horned god, or the Green Man.


Pisky Pixies

Cornwall, while considered by many as a part of the UK , the Cornish people have their own unique legends and folklore Amin to The British lands. Pixies are known generally as mischievous and practical jokes. The Cornish pixies have become very popular in folklore and, where can be associated Piskies as they are often referred to in Cornwall, rare and responsible for the classic saying ‘away with the pixies.”

Piskies as they are often referred to in Cornwall, rare and responsible for the classic saying ‘away with the pixies.”


The Yuletide Troll

In Iceland, folklore and legend of trolls can be found at nearly every strange rock formation. Constant volcanic activity in Iceland has meant the these are plentiful and these formations are believed to be the mountain-dwelling trolls who were caught in the dawn sunlight, instantly turned to stone. Testimony to the Icelandic trolls versus the popular media view that they are stupid and slow-witted, is the dark yuletide legend of the troll-witch Gryla. You won’t find any stories in Iceland of red-nosed reindeer, present-making elves or a merry St. Nicholas. Instead, one of the oldest legends is Gryla and her 12 Yule lads, twelve mischievous and sinister trolls present for 12 days before and after Christmas Day, or the length of Yuletide. But on Christmas Eve, the Yule Lads’ mother leaves her mountain home to stalk the night. Gryla takes orphan children who, without the protection of hearth and home, are defenceless. Once stolen away in a sack, they are taken back to her husband in their mountain cave and cooked into a stew. For Icelandic lore, the safety of having a home, protection of family and from the harsh Icelandic winter is embodied in the threatening figure of Gryla.