research, Writing

Dark Beira: Queen of Winter

In Scottish mythology, Beira or Dark Beira is the great mother of the gods and goddesses. She’s also known as the Cailleach, or the Cailleach Bheur in the Gaelic traditions of Ireland and the Isle of Man. Donald Alexander Mackenzie usually described her as being very tall and very old but could be terribly fierce… Continue reading Dark Beira: Queen of Winter

Long Fiction, Writing

Celtic Dark Fantasy

I am in the final stages of editing my draft dark fantasy novel inspired by Celtic mythology and literature (Arthurian, Welsh and Irish Cycles) and LGBTQI themes. In a portal fantasy where the gods, mortals and legendary Fae courts battle for dominance, the last of the sorceress and Fae bloodlines is lost. A struggle between… Continue reading Celtic Dark Fantasy

Long Fiction, Writing

Dark Fantasy & Climate Change

I am in the final stages of editing my draft dark fantasy novel inspired by North American and Canadian First Nations legends and environment and the influence of developing climate change. In a fantasy world where the gods, mortals and paranormal beings are dependent on the environment for stability and existence, the threat of a… Continue reading Dark Fantasy & Climate Change

research, Writing

The Skogsrå

The skogsrå is one of the important genii loci, the spirit of the Forest from Scandinavia. She will appear to hunters mostly but also to some travellers through the forests of her domain. The Skogsra is often described as human-like being, but with something uncanny about her. She’s often very beautiful but will have a… Continue reading The Skogsrå

research, Writing

Folklore of the Cursed Aye-Aye

In Madagascar, a highly unusual endangered nocturnal lemur is associated in regional as taboo or fady. The bizarre habits, secretive nature and distinctive appearance of the aye-aye fills some Madagascan peoples with the horror and dread at the sight of it. This has often lead to the slaughter of aye-ayes. In other regions of Madagascar,… Continue reading Folklore of the Cursed Aye-Aye

reads, Recent Reads

For the Wolf

Publisher’s Description THE FIRST DAUGHTER IS FOR THE THRONE.THE SECOND DAUGHTER IS FOR THE WOLF. As the only Second Daughter born in centuries, Red has one purpose - to be sacrificed to the Wolf in the Wood in order to save her kingdom. Red is almost relieved to go. Plagued by a dangerous power she… Continue reading For the Wolf

research

Legend of the Pussy Willow

"The Legend of the Pussy Willow" In an old Polish legend, many springs ago, a mother cat was crying at the bank of the river where her kittens were drowning. The willow at the river's edge longed to help her, so they swept their long graceful branches into the waters to rescue the tiny kittens… Continue reading Legend of the Pussy Willow

research

Folklore of Bluebells

The feared fairy bell and impending death According to English folklore, Bluebells were often used to call fairies…If you “rang” a bluebell like you would any normal bell, it was believed fairies would come to you. But fairies are notoriously dangerous bargainers and the need to call fairies for aid must be great to risk… Continue reading Folklore of Bluebells

reads, Recent Reads

Dark Nature

*** I received an ARC/Review copy of this book in exchange for an honest review *** Publisher’s Description Generation after generation, humans have ripped apart the world, leaving garbage and desolation in our wake.Burning, destroying, and stealing from the earth. We see it happening day by day and do nothing about it. Our air is… Continue reading Dark Nature

research, Short Fiction, Writing

Inuit legend of the Qallupilluk

I am always fascinated by First Nations legends and lore. One of my current research projects has focused on the Inuit legends of the Qallupilluk, monstrous female beings who lurk in the frozen waterways and beneath the ice sheets, snatching unwary children beneath the icy water. My latest short story examines this legend from the… Continue reading Inuit legend of the Qallupilluk